How to Build a Goat Shelter

Goats may be fairly independent creatures, but they won't show up with a tool belt prepared to fashion their own home. Regardless of climate, goats require an enclosure that will protect them from weather conditions such as wind, rain and changes in temperature. The ideal shelter should be located in an area not prone to flooding and have at least three sides, two of which designed to promote airflow, and a proper roof.

Goat
A simple enclosure can keep your goat safe from the elements.
credit: UmbertoPantalone/iStock/Getty Images

Using the circular saw, cut the 2-by-4s in half.

Lay out four of your cut 2-by-4s into a square. A 4-by-4 enclosure is suitable for one goat, as each goat requires about 10 square feet to be housed comfortably. The 4-inch length should be vertical.

Attach the 2-by-4s using the wood screws and the screwdriver. Use two screws at each corner for maximum stability.

Using the circular saw, cut 2 inches from two of the 2-by-4s you cut in step 1.

Measure a 45-degree angle on one end of each of the boards you cut in step 4, using the angle ruler, and mark the measurement with your pencil.

Cut both 2-by-4s along your pencil line using the circular saw.

Measure a 45-degree angle on one end of two of the 2-by-4s you cut in step 1 and mark the measurement with your pencil.

Cut both 2-by-4s along your pencil line using the circular saw.

Place one of the 2-by-4s from step 6 into the back right corner of the 10-by-10 frame you built in steps 2 and 3, with the 4-inch length facing outward. The board should sit flat against the ground, not flat against the frame; the highest point of the angled end should be facing forward. This will allow your roof to angle upward, higher in the front than in the back. Attach using the wood screws and screwdriver.

Place the other 2-by-4 from step 6 into the back rear corner in the same manner as in step 9, and then attach using the wood screws and screwdriver.

Place one of the 2-by-4s from step 8 into the front right corner in the same manner as in step 9, and attach using the wood screws and screwdriver.

Place the other 2-by-4 from step 8 into the front left corner in the same manner as in step 9, and then attach using the wood screws and screwdriver.

Attach one of the remaining 2-by-4s at the top of the two rear vertical 2-by-4s, running horizontally. Attach with wood screws and the power screwdriver. Use two screws at each end for maximum stability.

Attach the remaining 2-by-4 at the top of the two front vertical 2-by-4s, running horizontally. Attach with wood screws and the power screwdriver. Use two screws at each end for maximum stability.

Cut one sheet of plywood in half using the circular saw.

Using the measuring tape, measure 2 inches off one side of one of the plywood halves you cut in step 15.

Cut the plywood at the 2-inch mark using your circular saw.

Attach the plywood sheet to the back of your frame with the long side horizontal, using the wood screws and power screwdriver. Place a screw every 2 to 3 inches for maximum stability.

Using the measuring tape and pencil, measure and mark every 10 inches along the length of one of the plywood sheets.

Using the circular saw, cut widthwise at each 10-inch mark. You'll need eight pieces.

Attach the 10-inch pieces to the sides of the frame, using the wood screw and screwdriver. Place the screws 2 to 3 inches apart for maximum stability. Leave 2 inches between the boards for airflow.

Attach the remaining half sheet of plywood you cut in step 15 to the roof, placing the screws into the top of the four vertical 2-by-4s. Place additional screws 2 to 3 inches apart along the 2-by-4s that run along the top of the frame.

Add hay for bedding.