How Do Bats Get Inside Your Home?

By Jessica Reed

How Do Bats Get Inside Your Home?

Bats can be found all over the world, with as many as 40 different species in the United States alone. We've often heard horror stories about bats getting stuck in people's hair, or sucking our blood at night. But, the truth is that bats are a necessary part of our ecosystem and these stories are based on myth. Bats can enter your home through holes in your walls, cracks underneath the eaves of your house, holes or openings around your chimney, or through loose boards that may be falling down. Bats like the dark and will usually be found behind something that gives them a protective space, like the corners of an attic.

Are Bats Dangerous?

Bats are no danger to humans. Vampire bats are the only type that drink blood, and they do no live in the United States. However, even these creatures do not suck blood as people might think. They simply make a small cut on their victim's skin and lap the blood with their tongue. Rarely do they bite humans, but even if they do you only have to get checked out to avoid disease. The only danger from bats is if they carry rabies or leave behind feces that contains a disease in it. You can wear a respirator for safety if you need to clean up a bat's feces. Bats do not become aggressive, so the likelihood of catching rabies from one is much smaller than most wild animals.

How to Get Rid of Bats in Your Home

Getting rid of bats in your home is a simple process. You'll wait for the bats to leave for the night and close up the hole. You want to make sure they have all left so you don't trap any inside your house, but you won't have to go anywhere near them. After dark, watch for the bats leaving your home. Once you find where they're living, cover the hole with a piece of net, or a sturdy piece of cloth. Secure it at the top and about halfway down both sides so that the bats can fly out. Once they're out, they won't be able to get back in because of this covering.

Check for a couple nights, and when it appears no bats are leaving the house, seal the hole during the day. Check your house for any large cracks, holes, or openings, especially around the eaves, doors, windows, and chimney if you have one. Block these up as well to prevent future bat infestations.