How to Make a Horse Walker

By Jolee Lautaret

Horse walkers, or hot walkers, are often used as time savers for exercising horses or cooling down following a workout. Walkers are also sometimes used to rehabilitate injured horses.

Purchasing new or used horse walkers is easy, but they are expensive. Depending on your preferences, walkers can range from $3,000 to $20,000.

Choosing to make your own walker may be a solution for the cash-strapped horse owner, as parts can be bought gradually and then assembled. While horse walkers come in many types, a do-it-yourselfer should build a standard type walker and keep it as simple as possible.

Preparation

Choose a location for your walker. Be sure the location is accessible to 220v single-phase power and is not in an area prone to flooding. Use the tractor to level the ground.

Build a framework for the concrete pad, which anchors the walker. Measure and cut the boards to the size desired. The foundation should be at least 5 feet by 5 feet and 1 inch thick. Nail the 2x4s together into a square form and anchor with the rebar pieces.

Mix your concrete and pour into the form. Use the concrete float to finish and allow sufficient drying time, usually one day or longer, depending on the weather.

Use the shovel or tractor to dig an underground line for electricity from your power source to the foundation.

Hire a certified electrician to pull the wire through the conduit and do the preliminary electrical work. Bury the middle section of the conduit.

Build the Walker

Cut the square tubing into the pieces needed for the framework and arms of the walker. The longer the arms, the greater the distance your horses will walk. Most four-horse walkers have arms between 14 and 17 feet long. Arms should be at least 8 feet above the ground.

Weld the pieces together or hire a welder to complete the task for you. Weld the rings to the ends of the arms to make connection points for the tethers.

Cut the galvanized sheet metal to cover the box for the motor. Weld three sides to the frame. Weld the hinges and latch to the fourth side to create a door that can be opened for maintenance on the motor.

Insert the motor into the framework and connect to the center post. Bring the electrician back to connect the motor to the power source and control box. Finish burying the electrical line.

Secure the nylon straps to the rings on the arms. Horses can now be tethered to the walker by snapping the straps to their halters.