How to Treat Dandruff in Goats

Goats are susceptible to a variety of skin and coat problems that are normally caused by diet and mineral deficiencies. Flaky skin and a dull coat are often symptoms of dandruff, a dry skin condition that causes the outer layer of skin to slough off more frequently than is necessary. Several other conditions, including mange and worms can cause dandruff-like symptoms, so take your goat to a veterinarian before you try to treat the dandruff on your own.

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Black goats are especially susceptible to dandruff.

Rule out other potential conditions. Check for lice, which lay eggs that look like dandruff. Separate your goat's hair and look at the skin with a magnifying glass. If you see any bugs, odds are good your goat has lice. Recent changes in diet can cause allergic skin reactions. If you've recently altered your goat's diet, switch back to the old diet. If the dandruff goes away, your goat is suffering from allergies.

Wash your goat with warm water and a mild detergent soap. This will eliminate any skin or fur irritants that are contributing to the dandruff. Apply a 1 percent diptrex ointment or .06 percent lindane spray to your goat's skin. Most farm supply stores sell these dandruff treatments. Avoid getting the treatments in your goat's eyes or ears.

Provide vital nutrients in your goat's diet. Dandruff is frequently a sign of copper deficiency. Supplement your goat's feed with a multivitamin designed for farm animals. Pop open one vitamin E capsule and pour the oil over your goat's food every day. Vitamin E helps prevent skin ailments and moisturizes dry skin.

Add foods to your goat's diet that help maintain skin health. Black oil sunflower seeds, sea kelp and alfalfa pellets all help to cure dandruff and prevent future outbreaks.