What Vegetables & Fruits Are Good to Feed My Dog?

By Michelle A. Rivera

Dogs are omnivores. They are members of the carnivore group, but anyone who has ever been in the same room with one knows beyond a shadow of a doubt they will eat just about anything that falls onto their radar. If you think dogs don't like corn, peas or grains, just let a toddler dribble the contents of his creamed veggies onto the floor and watch your dog go to town. Dogs are omnivores, and as such, they can eat just about anything humans can.

Skin and Coat

Canned pumpkin, but not pumpkin pie filling, is good for dogs.

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Any vegetables and fruits that are good for you are good for your dog and for the same reasons. The folate found in carrots, apricots and pumpkin is good for you because it helps aid in tissue growth and cell production in humans. It does so in dogs as well. Likewise, green leafy vegetables provide red blood cell production and maintenance of skin and coat. The riboflavin in the leafy greens, as well as the vitamin B2, is healthy for both dogs and people.

Immune System

Fruits and vegetables high in vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, aid in the proper functioning of the immune system. Citrus fruits, berries, cauliflower, tomatoes, green peppers and certain kinds of lettuce are all good sources of vitamin C. Your dog might not like oranges, grapefruit and tangerines, but it won't hurt him to eat it. Dogs with joint and musculoskeletal disorders can benefit from vitamin supplements as well as fresh fruit and vegetables that contain these ingredients. The canine body can manufacture its own vitamin C but not in enough quantities to suffice.

Pumpkin, Apples, Peas, Carrots and Oranges

Don't let your dog eat the seeds of an apple. Slice the apple and give him slices, perhaps frozen in ice cubes.

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Canned pumpkin is an excellent addition for your dog's diet, according to The Daily Puppy. Pumpkin not only adds beta-carotene, an immune booster and cancer fighter in humans (although not definitively proved in studies with dogs), but high fiber as well. Apples can be given in moderation, though the seeds should be avoided as they contain cyanide, which carries oxygen from the blood. Peas provide calcium, potassium and magnesium, as well as other nutrients.

Absolute Do Not Feed

Chocolate, raisins and macadamia nuts are bad for dogs.

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Perhaps a discussion of what fruits and vegetables that can be fed to a dog is simpler if the list is reduced to those items that should not be fed to a dog. Virtually every fruit or vegetable a human being can eat, with the exception of the following, can and should be fed to a dog for a well-balanced diet. Items that dogs should never eat include: grapes, chocolate, caffeine, raisins, onions, garlic, mushrooms and certain items with the artificial sugar substitute Xylitol. Onion and garlic powder or salts are suitable for addition to homemade dog biscuits, however, because it is in such a small amount.