How Often Do Cats Pee?

Little Siberian Breed Cat Sitting in Litter Box
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Anyone who's cleaned a litter box can tell you that cats pee a lot. But how much is normal? And what do you do when your cat is avoiding the box all together? With so many reasons for being a cat person, it is not surprising that the humans who love their feline friends will forgive their cats of almost anything. Unfortunately, the lingering malodorous scent of cat pee is a little harder to forgive and forget. If you're finding your favorite furball is filling her litter box a little more than normal, it might be time to look into her drinking habits.

How much water do cats typically drink?

It is important to provide your cat with fresh water every day. Having her water dish available at all times is a pretty good way to make sure she staying hydrated--especially if you live in a particularly hot or dry climate. While cats get some of their daily water from their food, the majority of their daily intake will come from their fresh water supply. Since they need about a cup of water or approximately 240ml each day, your kitty might get dehydrated if their water dish is not clean or has run out of water.

Young Maine Coon cat sitting in a closed llitter box and looking sideways.
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How often does a healthy cat pee?

A healthy cat pees somewhere between two and four times per day, but if your cat is peeing less or more often, it doesn't necessarily mean he's got a health problem. If you are concerned about the amount of urine, you can monitor it by making sure the litter box is clean. In fact, some cats might even hold their urine if their box is too full or smelly. If you've toilet trained your cat, you might not be able to tell, so be sure to have fresh water available at all times.

Why is my cat peeing outside the litter box?

There are a few possible reasons your cat is peeing outside the litter box. One common reason is urine marking. A cat will use their urine to mark their territory. Some cats prefer to have their own space and to simply be left alone. To ensure this happens, they leave their potent scent around to let everyone know which areas are theirs and theirs alone.

Of course, some of the time, a cat peeing outside of its litter box is a sign of something else, such as a health or behavior issue. If your cat is peeing on the regular, but he's avoiding his litter box to pee on people or things, you might want to first rule out any health issues. If it turns out to be behavioral, it might be stemming from anxiety from too much stimulation or changes to his environment. Keep your cool, crack out the cleaning supplies, and shower your baby-kitty with love and affection. Maybe he'll keep it in the litter box.

Cute cat in plastic litter box on floor
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What might make a cat pee more than usual?

Cats generally are good about regulating themselves when it comes to their food and water, but if your cat is suffering from health issues, you may notice you're cleaning the litter box more often. If that is the case, first determine if you are seeing more urine volume, or more urine frequency, since they can indicate different types of problems.

If your cat is peeing more often, so with greater frequency, but the overall quantity of urine is the same, she may have issues with her bladder or an infection. If the opposite is true, and she's peeing large quantities of urine but no more often than normal, this may be a sign of a serious kidney disease or diabetes.

Cat using toilet, cat in litter box, for pooping or urinate, pooping in clean sand toilet. Grey cat breed Russian Blue.
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If my cat is peeing more than normal, when should I take them to a vet?

If your cat is peeing noticeably more in terms of either quantity or frequency, it is important to take her to the vet. Both cases can be signs of serious issues such as infections, bladder issues, kidney disease or diabetes.