What The World Looks Like To Your Cat

By Ashley Tyler

Cats probably have some pretty crazy stories to tell about their owners. They might even have some strong opinions on things like your new love interest or that store brand cat food you brought home last week when the regular stuff was sold out. But have you ever thought about what it would be like to literally see things from their point of view?

What The World Looks Like To Your Cat
credit: Giphy

One young artist named Nikolay Lamm set out to do just that. After extensive research and consultations with a team of veterinarian ophthalmologists, Lamm was able to create a stunning set of simulations that show us exactly what your kitty sees behind those glowing yellow eyes.

Human Vision vs. Cat Vision
credit: Nikolay Lamm
Human Vision vs. Cat Vision
credit: Nikolay Lamm
Human Vision vs. Cat Vision
Human vision is on the top and cats on the bottom.
credit: Nikolay Lamm

According to Lamm's research, most of the differences between human and feline vision have to do with photoreceptors in the eye. Humans have more cone shaped receptors while cats have more rod shaped ones.

Human Vision vs. Cat Vision
credit: Tech Insider

These rods mean your cat has a wider range of vision and can see things beyond what you can with your mere human peripheral vision. We can see 180 degrees, whereas the cat can see 200 degrees. So when it feels like your cat is always watching you, know that he most definitely is.

The rods give their eyes a faster refresh rate too, which helps your cat lock his sights on that fly buzzing around your apartment. In turn, that means when we see something moving very slowly, cats don't see it moving at all. This is also what lets them see better at night. According to Lamm's findings, cats see 6 to 8 times better in dim light than we do.

What The World Looks Like To Your Cat
credit: StareCat

While Grumpy Cat may come with built in night vision and be able to detect even the quickest movements, it comes at a colorful cost. The vibrant hues we see when we look around us, are dull, muted and blurry from a cats perspective. Lamm found that while we may be able to see clearly for 100 to 200 feet, a cat can only see up to 20 feet.

So the next time you see your kitty sleeping the day away in a patch of sun and you think how great it would be to just be your cat instead of being a lame adult, just remember that the catnip isn't always greener on the other side.