Which Dogs Get Along with Pugs?

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Pugs are extremely popular and identifiable dogs primarily because of their unique flat face and bulging, expressive eyes. Since they were first bred to be lap dogs or companion pugs by ancient Chinese royalty 2,000 years ago, pugs have been personable, even-tempered, and outgoing pets. Consequently, they get along well with other dogs, but considering their size and activity level, certain breeds, such as the Maltese, Havanese, and poodle make better companions for pugs. Pugs often get along best with other pugs.

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Pugs often get along best with other pugs.
Image Credit: Pham Thang / 500px/500px/GettyImages

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Pugs and breathing issues

Pugs are brachycephalic dogs, meaning the skull bones are shortened, and they can have breathing problems. Excessive running or playing, especially in extreme hot or wintry weather, can be dangerous for pugs. Their short nasal passages make it harder for them to regulate both the temperature and the amount of oxygen flowing into the lungs.

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Pugs can suffer from breathing issues if playing with exceedingly high-energy dogs. Therefore, herding breeds, such as the Australian cattle dog, or bird dogs, such as the springer spaniel, are not good companions for pugs. While pugs are playful dogs, excessive running or chasing isn't recommended. Other brachycephalic dogs, such as the French bulldog or Boston terrier, make better playmates for a spunky pug.

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Pugs and companion pugs

Pugs are generally social dogs, so providing them other companions is often a good idea if you're prepared to look after more than one dog. Because two pugs will be similar in size and activity level, they are ideal playmates for each other, reducing injuries from size differences and mitigating breathing issues from overactivity. Two pugs likely won't overdo it. Plus, they'll be each other's playmate while still being loving, devoted lap dogs.

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The sex of the pugs doesn't really matter if both are fixed. In fact, selecting a companion pug based on personality and age might be a better plan. Waiting until one dog is 2 or 3 years old before introducing a puppy or younger dog is a practical approach because the older one will teach the other. A fun fact is that three or more pugs together are called a grumble.

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Pugs and other breeds

Generally, pugs are an even-tempered, outgoing breed who get along best with breeds of similar personality traits. If size and breathing issues aren't issues of focus for selecting companions for pugs, then breed disposition should be considered.

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Maltese, for instance, are suited to indoor living like pugs and are prone to separation anxiety, so they would benefit from pug company. Similarly, Havanese are friendly, loyal like pugs, and are good with other dogs. Also, standard poodles are known for their happy-go-lucky personalities and are generally friendly and gentle with pugs.

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Pugs are a popular dog breed, almost as popular as Labrador and golden retrievers, so finding them in the same home is not uncommon. Like pugs, retrievers are usually outgoing, confident, and people-focused dogs. Personalitywise, the breeds are similar and will likely get along well, but the size difference will mean they might require different exercise routines and activities. Pugs also have a similar coat to retrievers and shed at the same rate.

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Introducing new dogs

Finally, when introducing a pug or any dog to a new canine family member, do so cautiously. Introduce dogs in a neutral space, such as outdoors in a park, rather than in the home. Don't carry or hold the new pup when they first meet.

Monitor the dogs carefully and spend time with each dog individually. Feed them in separate places at first and never put them in the same crate because each dog should have his own space.

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