Foods That Give Dogs More Energy

By Ricky Durrance

Dogs need a balanced diet to live a healthy and happy life. From time to time you may notice that your dog is lethargic or tired, which could be due to a poor diet or underlying medical reasons. In many cases, it may be advised to feed your dog some more high-energy foods to give them a pick-me-up and get them back to their best. Your dog needs this energy to support their body functions and to maintain a constant body temperature.

Raw Meat

Protein is vital should account for 20 percent of their overall diet. There is no better source of pure protein than raw meat. Lamb meat is a popular option and it is best to feed it on the bone to dogs. Dogs will easily eat meat off the bone as long as it is raw -- do not give your dog cooked bones because they are softer and can become a choking hazard. Frozen meat is a good option and they can also eat cheap meat cuts like hamburger.


Carbohydrates are compounds used for energy and digestion, and they supply the body cells with glucose, making them essential energy foods for dogs. A cheap and easy source of carbohydrates is rice. As well as being a good source of energy, white rice is also known to improve a dog's digestive system and is often fed to dogs who are suffering from diarrhea. Many commercial dog foods contain rice, so proving your dog with it is simple.


Fats are concentrated forms of energy and should make up between 9 and 15 percent of your dog's diet. Essential fats are commonly found in most commercial dog foods, so by buying a good brand will provide them with enough essential fats. Fish oil and hydrogenated coconut oil can cause vitamin E deficiency if fed in high concentrations. A lack of fats can also cause other problems including skin infections.

Vitamin Supplements

Buy vitamin supplements from your local pet store. Vitamins are essential in any dog diet, and a lack of them can make your dog weak, which in turn will reduce their overall energy levels. Vitamin B is a B-complex vitamin that contains coenzymes, which are involved in energy production. Like essential fats, these vitamins are often found in commercial dog food although special supplements are available for individual purchase.