Gangrene in Dogs

By Taylor DiVico

Gangrene in dogs is a severe, life-threatening condition brought on by bacteria that has entered the skin due to the onset of infection in open wounds. Gangrene kills tissue and damages organs, causing pain and discomfort in dogs.


Untreated infections can lead to gangrene in dogs, as open sores allow bacteria to infiltrate damaged, cracked skin and abscesses, deteriorating tissue and organs.


Canine gangrene can be identified by common symptoms that accompany the condition, such as fever, nausea, decreased energy level and loss of appetite.


Gangrene in dogs causes the affected areas of the skin to turn black and moist, with visible pus and blood draining from the infection site.


Female dogs can develop a mastitis infection while nursing, which can potentially lead to gangrene mastitis that may require the amputation of the affected nipple in prevention of further tissue damage.


Gangrene can be prevented by examining dogs for sores, wounds and skin irritations, and by increasing immunity against bacteria through probiotics, while veterinarian-prescribed antibiotic treatments heal infections in avoidance of gangrene.