Hydrogen Peroxide for Dog Urine

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As puppies gain control over their bladder, it's almost a certainty that they will have an accident now and again. Older dogs can have an occasional loss of control as well, whether from relocating to a new home or experiencing symptoms of old age. Using hydrogen peroxide for dog pee can help clean up urine as well as disinfect and deodorize.

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Puppies will definitely have accidents.
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How hydrogen peroxide works

Hydrogen peroxide is an activated oxygen product consisting of two hydrogen molecules and two oxygen molecules — one more oxygen molecule than water. When H2O2 comes in contact with catalase — an enzyme produced by many plants, animals, bacteria, and fungi — it produces a bubbling effect as it breaks down, becoming water and releasing its extra oxygen molecule as gas.

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Peroxide is a very effective biocide, killing both healthy and unhealthy cells as it bubbles away. This means it's a very effective disinfectant to use in cleaning up both pet urine and feces. Use hydrogen peroxide for dog pee in the laundry, on hard surfaces and equipment, or on porous, colorfast items, such as carpeting.

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Types of hydrogen peroxide

The hydrogen peroxide you can buy at your local grocery store or pharmacy is just right for cleaning up pet urine. The solution is labeled as 3 percent hydrogen peroxide and usually says "stabilized" on the rear of the container when it contains things such as tin, phenol, or other chemicals that keep the product from degrading in the bottle. This type of hydrogen peroxide is the ideal hydrogen peroxide for pet stains and urine cleanup.

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Food-grade hydrogen peroxide does not contain stabilizers. Solutions of food-grade hydrogen peroxide available at your grocery store or pharmacy are usually a 3 percent solution, but you can find solutions that range up to 35 percent. The food-grade solution will lose its potency if it sits in your cabinet for long periods of time. Higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, such as 35 percent or above, will also bleach your flooring or fabrics and can potentially explode the bottle.

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Solutions can range up to 90 percent hydrogen peroxide, but 3 percent and 12 percent are the most common. Solutions over 8 percent qualify as Class 5 hazardous materials, requiring special attention to both shipping and storage in the home. A 3 percent solution can be safely stored in your home and ordered online without any special requirements.

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Dog urine cleaner

Before cleaning with hydrogen peroxide, blot up as much urine as you can from the floor or carpet. Put hydrogen peroxide in a spray bottle or screw a spray top onto the hydrogen peroxide bottle and spritz the pet stain liberally. Let it rest for 10 to 15 minutes and then blot it up using a paper towel or a clean cloth. If you want a fresh scent, add a few drops of lavender or another essential oil to your hydrogen peroxide bottle.

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Hydrogen peroxide for pet stains

Remove unsightly and smelly urine stains from bedding, mattresses, carpeting, and more with hydrogen peroxide, baking soda, and dish soap. The solution is also the best human urine odor remover if your child happens to wet the bed, and you discover your mattress protector isn't waterproof.

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Add a few drops of liquid dish detergent to 8 ounces of hydrogen peroxide and put the solution into a spray bottle. Spray the stain thoroughly, being sure to mist beyond the edges of the stain. Let the solution soak in for 10 to 15 minutes and then sprinkle baking soda onto the moist area. Rub it in lightly using your gloved hand to help the baking soda absorb the solution. Allow the area to dry completely and vacuum thoroughly.

The hydrogen peroxide for urine will deodorize and remove the stain. The solution will lightly bleach some materials, such as a memory foam mattress. If using this cleaner solution on a couch or area rug, test an area that is not noticeable so you can determine any bleaching effect on the fabric.

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