What Kind of Birds Can Live With Parakeets?

By Scott Morgan

Parakeets are sweet, sociable members of the parrot family who crave the company of other birds. They're also small and delicate, and not every type of house bird finds them to be charming roommates. Keep your parakeet safe, happy and healthy by pairing her with friendly company.

Other Parakeets Are Best

It may sound obvious, but it's easily overlooked that the best company for a parakeet is another parakeet. Females are dominant in parakeet society, so if you have a male, it will be easier on him to pair him with another male.

Putting two females in a cage is fine as long as it's a large cage that allows them to separate. Females in small cages may fight a lot.

Cockatiels

Parakeets and their similar-size cousins, cockatiels, typically get along rather well. Then again, cockatiels tend to get along with pretty much every small bird.

Though smaller, parakeets may dominate cockatiels, who don't seem too worried about the arrangement. Providing an extra bathtub for a cockatiel, and a few spare branches, in the cage will keep confrontations at bay.

Finches

Some species of finch are great company for parakeets, others are not. The most likely to get along with your parakeet is the equally sociable zebra finch, who hails from Australia, as budgerigars, a type of parakeet, do.

Other finches that can live harmoniously with parakeets include the nutmeg mannikin, the java sparrow, the double-barred finch and the cordon-bleu. It is best to avoid other types of finches, as parakeets, particularly females, could become aggressive toward them.

If you have an outdoor aviary, quails and parakeets get along famously.

Some Birds to Avoid

While a canary, a good-natured songbird, will not usually bother a parakeet, a parakeet might not tolerate a canary. It is best to keep and feed them in separate cages.

Some species of parrot, such as the rosella and the Bourke's parrot, usually get along fine with parakeets and budgies, but only in very large aviaries. Even then, there's no guarantee of safety for a parakeet. Rosellas, especially, can be very aggressive to the smaller parakeets and budgies, even with ample room. Never keep these birds in a small area together.

It's All About Space

Even birds that get along need their own space. Confrontations happen when any bird feels another is encroaching on her personal territory. However, you can avoid or minimize captive conflicts.

Keep parakeets and their companions in larger cages together or in a more open confined area. Feeding them separately and paying individual equal attention to them can also help quell jealousy-induced conflict.