Previcox for Humans

By Jennifer Garcia

Some human drugs can be used to treat certain illnesses and conditions in dogs. Benadryl is one example of a human drug that can be used for dogs. Rarely, if at all, is it ever acceptable to use drugs that have been approved for use in dogs to treat human illnesses. One such drug that should not be used by humans is Previcox. Previcox is manufactured solely for the use in dogs and should never be tried by humans.


Previcox is manufactured by a company called Merial. Federal law restricts prescribing this drug except by a veterinarian. Previcox comes in chewable tablet form and is typically prescribed in 5 mg doses for adult dogs. Previcox is an anti-inflammatory drug, however it is not a steroid or a narcotic. Previcox tablets usually come in a blister pack. The light beige-colored pills are typically administered in 10-dosage packs, however, they also come in bottles, which contain more pills.


Previcox is a drug used to treat the inflammation and pain in dogs that is associated with osteoarthritis. It is also used to treat the inflammation and pain that dogs can suffer from surgery that's been performed on the soft tissue. It's also used to treat pain associated with canine orthopedic surgery. In summary, Previcox is used for pain management in dogs and is prescribed by a veterinarian. Human ingestion of this drug is strongly discouraged by the Food and Drug Administration.


There are many adverse affects that a dog can suffer from taking Previcox, therefore if a human takes it, it's that much more dangerous. In fact, if a human accidentally ingests Previcox, medical attention must be sought immediately. A reputable medical doctor would never prescribe Previcox for humans.


Dogs who take Previcox can experience an adverse reaction to the medication. Some of the symptoms a dog can experience range from nausea and vomiting to anorexia, decreased appetite and diarrhea. Pain, as well as lethargy are also common side effects. In addition, Previcox can affect dogs in a different way and can make them hyper. If a dog is prescribed Previcox for surgery, the incision site might swell and ooze and the dog might also experience bruising. With these sorts of side effects possible in dogs, it's not hard to imagine how dangerous this drug could be to a human.


It's important for humans to realize how dangerous this drug can be if ingested. Previcox can cause the following side effects in dogs: cardiovascular and respiratory; dermatological and immunological; hematological; urinary as well as gastrointestinal. As with all medications, there will be side effects, however, humans should never take medication that has been prescribed to an animal. In addition, animals should never be given medication that has been prescribed to humans unless a veterinarian has been consulted first.