The Room Temperature Needed for Sun Conures

By Falinia Adkins

Sun conures are parrots that grows to reach 11 to 12 inches in height, which includes their long tail feathers. Like many parrots, sun conures are native to the warmer temperatures of South America. Conures can regulate their body temperature, but they are not capable of withstanding extreme temperatures or shifts in temperature. Providing the right environment for your parrot promotes healthy behaviors and reduces the risk of sickness and injury.

Cage Temperatures

The ideal room temperature for sun conures is between 62 and 74 degrees Fahrenheit. Conures should not be near drafts or heat/AC vents because the fluctuation in temperature can cause illness. If you keep cooler temperatures in your home, you should provide a sleeping huts for your parrot at all times, and use a cage cover at night to prevent drafts. Extreme temperatures such those that occur in homes or buildings without a consistent heat heat source and cool air can be dangerous to birds causing hypothermia or heat stroke.

Cage Lighting

Ideal lighting conditions provide all the rays of the sun without the heat, which can be accomplished in two ways. Because glass window panes block the rays that birds need most, placing the bird near an open window or outdoor aviary will provide the rays needed to convert food to vitamin D. Another option is to purchase a full-spectrum light bulb that provides all the rays a parrot needs to be healthy.

Cage Space

Because of their length, sun conures require more space than the smaller bird breeds. Flight cages are always preferred over economy cages, and the larger the cage the better. Conures are curious and active birds that will use all the space they are given. A single sun conure needs a cage that is is at least two feett wide, two feet long and 2 1/2 feet tall. You should nearly double that for two birds. Without adequate space for their wings to stretch, these birds will fail to thrive.

Cage Location

Birds are social creatures that require a human or bird flock to be mentally and physically healthy, but they don't need to be in the busiest intersection in the house. A quiet place near window, but within view of the family gatherings such as meal times is optimal. When placing the sun conure's cage, keep in mind that if the cage is placed near a television, radio, or bright light source during sleeping times, birds develop screaming and behavior problems because of lack of rest.