How to Stop a Cat in Heat From Peeing Everywhere

During her heat cycle, an unspayed female cat will urinate throughout her territory to let males know she is ready to rumble. When her territory is also your house, it becomes necessary to try and curb this behavior. If you choose not to spay her, stopping her urination may require a multi-faceted approach.

Cute bengal funny cat playing
During her heat cycle, an unspayed female cat will urinate throughout her territory to let males know she is ready to rumble.
credit: Ingus Kruklitis/iStock/GettyImages

Cat peeing for attention

If your female cat has started spraying because she is in heat, there's a very real possibility that she is looking for some attention. It's not your attention that she wants, although her antics have likely garnered it. By spreading her fertile scent, your cat is actually trying to attract a mate.

In the throes of cat pee cleanup, it's easy to get frustrated with your feline friend. Remember, however, that your cat is simply doing what her instincts tell her to do. Contrary to popular belief, cats don't urinate in inappropriate places out of spite. Your cat isn't seeking revenge for a perceived slight, even if she pees on your bed right in front of you.

It's important to keep this in mind when resolving urination issues. In order to succeed, you need to stop thinking like a human and start thinking like a cat.

The simple solution

The easiest and most effective way to stop your cat from spraying is to spay her. If left intact, your cat will experience a heat cycle every spring and fall. This translates into multiple opportunities for her to drive you crazy with her marking, howling, and repeated escape attempts. It's also potentially two unwanted litters of kittens every year.

Your cat's heat cycle is just as stressful for her as it is for you. You may find yourself dealing with some undesirable behavior, but your cat is the one being driven by strong natural urges she can't control or satisfy. You'll both likely be happier if you have her spayed before she enters her first heat at around five months of age.

Block off sightlines

Pretend your doctor tells you that even though it's your favorite, you need to stop eating chocolate cake. Resisting temptation would likely be quite difficult, but it would be even harder if you sat a chocolate cake on your kitchen counter where you could see it and smell it. The same is true for your cat. When she feels the urge to mate, watching male cats stroll by your house is stressful, and it may cause her to urinate more in an effort to attract their attention.

Help her by blocking certain views from your windows. Provide your cat with an aquarium or bird feeder to watch while pulling the blinds on windows that give her a view of the neighbor's cat or local strays. Removing certain visual stimuli may not completely resolve urination issues but it can help a great deal.

Keep her box clean

Even when they're not in heat, cats use urine to leave behind their scent and mark their territory. For domestic cats, their scent is typically the strongest in and around the litter box. If a cat can't smell herself when using her box, she is likely to urinate in it to reclaim her space. Hopefully, your cat will notice her scent fading and make an effort to remark her litter box rather than urinating in other places.

It's also important to clean up accidents promptly and thoroughly. If your cat pees where she shouldn't, clean the urine as soon as you find it and cover the spot with foil or plastic. This gives the enzymes time to completely dissolve the smell and blocks your cat from accessing the area again. Any urine scent left behind is a green light to pee there again, so make sure you clean well.

A little help here?

Yikes, my cat peed on my bed while I was sleeping! If your cat pees on your bed while you were asleep, or otherwise blatantly urinates where she shouldn't, she may be trying to send you a message. Certain medical conditions, such as kidney stones, can cause a cat to urinate more frequently and do so where she shouldn't. Your cat can't simply talk to you to tell you something is wrong, so she may try and leave clues in obvious places so you can help.

Showing you medical issues is a sign that your cat trusts you completely, so don't reward her with irate behavior. Instead, check with your vet to confirm that your cat truly is in heat and not experiencing another issue.