How to Minimize Dog Shedding

Unfortunately, dog shedding is a common problem for virtually all breeds, whether they have short or long hair. Of course, breeds with finer, softer hair may shed even worse. Either way, when dog shedding happens, you could be putting yourself and your family at greater risk for allergies and other breathing problems. Also, when it comes to aesthetics, excessive dog fur doesn't look right on your carpet or furniture.

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Wash your dog. Before you can stop dog shedding, you must make sure that your pet is properly groomed. This process begins by thoroughly washing both his fur and skin. A dog washing shower attachment makes bathing a lot easier. You won't get water all over the place, plus there won't be any shampoo left behind on the dog's skin.

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Comb and brush your dog's fur. Use dog shedding combs and brushes to remove the top layers of fur. Make a habit of doing this every day, especially in the morning.

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Use a vacuum dog brush. The techniques mentioned above do not help as much when it comes to removing a dog's undercoat. That's why you will want to consider an additional regime: sucking out some of the undercoat with a vacuum dog brush. These attachments are readily available at any pet store, and they're easy to use. Just place it at the end of a vacuuming hose, and you'll be ready for business.

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Add a tablespoon of olive oil to your dog's food. Olive oil contains omega-3 fatty acids, which are nutrients that are essential for your dog's skin and fur. And, since olive oil is virtually tasteless, you won't have to worry about the dog rejecting his food after it's been added.

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Give your pet dog vitamins. If a dog is malnourished, he is more likely to shed because he's not receiving enough nutrients to maintain the health of his fur. Talk to your vet about the best vitamin and food regime for your dog's overall health.

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Schedule an appointment with your vet. Sometimes dog shedding is caused by a more serious health problem.