How to Use Equine Wormers for Dogs

By Jo Chester

Breeders and other people who own or foster many dogs often find it useful to know how to give their own vaccinations and prophylactic medications. Using horse wormer, measured in doses appropriate for dogs, is a common cost-saving measure, particularly among large-dog owners or those who own packs of hunting dogs. Although converting equine wormers for use in dogs is not a difficult task, it does require attention to detail to prevent accidental overdose from occurring.

General Instructions

Determine what kind of worms need to be treated. Some types of worms are simple to identify visually. Many charts are available online or in books to assist with this task.

Confirm the diagnosis of intestinal worms by taking a stool sample to a veterinarian. These tests are inexpensive and will prevent treating your dogs for the wrong kind of parasite.

Unlike intestinal worms, a heartworm infestation does not exhibit external symptoms. Such an infestation must always be diagnosed using a blood panel at your veterinarian's office.

Obtain an accurate weight for all dogs to be treated. It is possible to dose all of the dogs in the group as a precaution if 1) all of the dogs live in a single group in which cross-infection can take place, and 2) if none of the dogs are pregnant, nursing, debilitated, or are taking medications contraindicated for use with the wormer.

Treating with Ivermectin (Heartworm, monthly)

Determine if Ivermectin is recommended for the breed of dog. Ivermectin should not be used for any white-footed herding breeds, such as collies, Shetland sheep dogs or corgis.

Calculate the appropriate dosage for each dog being treated. The proper canine dosage for liquid Ivermectin consists of one-tenth of a cc for every ten pounds of dog.

Draw up the correct dosage into the plastic syringe. Double-check the amount in the syringe prior to giving it to the dog.

Give the medication by either squirting it toward the roof of the dog's mouth at the back of his throat, or 2) into the cheek pouch near his molars. Stroke the dog's throat, if necessary, to encourage swallowing.

Treating with Strongid T (Hookworms)

Calculate the appropriate dosage for each dog being treated. The recommended canine dosage for Strongid T consists of 2.5 mg to 5 mg per pound of body weight (see Reference 2).

Draw up the correct dosage into the plastic syringe. Double-check the amount in the syringe prior to giving it to the dog.

Administer the oral suspension by mouth. Strongid T is flavored and should be highly palatable, so special handling should not be necessary.