How Does Spaying Affect Female Dogs?

If you are the beaming owner of a female dog, whether she's a puppy or full-grown adult, then you should consider spaying surgery for a variety of reasons. Spaying prevents female dogs from being able to bear litters of young, but also offers other benefits, including some pertaining to health.

No Change in Temperament

If you are worried that your adorable dog's generally personality could change due to spaying, don't be. Spaying has no effect on general canine temperament, indicates the experts at the College of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis. Outside of ceasing heat cycles and some of the associated patterns, your furry pal will not act differently.

No Longer Fertile

Female dogs lose their ability to reproduce as soon as their spaying surgeries are through. Ovariohysterectomies call for the extraction of the reproductive organs -- the uterus and ovaries. With these organs out of your pet's body, she no longer can get pregnant. Litters of puppies are just not possible in spayed animals.

Bye Bye to Estrus

If a girl pooch isn't spayed, then estrus, or "heat" cycles, are inevitable -- usually on a twice-a-year basis. When dogs are in season, they essentially gear up for the entire breeding process, from mating to gestation. After spaying, heat cycles become nonexistent, as do all of the temperament swings that frequently come along with them -- think restlessness, irritation, nervousness and testiness. Without heat cycles, your dog could remain her usual calm and happy self, all year long -- no nonstop whimpering or uncharacteristically frenzied behavior.

General Health and Longevity

Spaying also can change your precious girl dog in that it can oftentimes enhance her chances of longevity and optimal health. Spayed female dogs generally have longer lifespans, indicates the ASPCA. The health advantages of the procedure are especially high in cases of early age spaying -- preferably before sexual maturity and the emergence of estrus cycles. It either completely prevents or minimizes the chances of many types of illnesses, including uterine cancer, pyometra, breast cancer and ovarian tumors.

No Weight Changes

Spaying also doesn't lead to weight problems in dogs. What can lead to weight issues in canines, however, is excessive eating. Insufficient physical fitness can also trigger weight gain, so take note and focus on your pet's health.

By Naomi Millburn

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References
American Humane Association: Spaying / Neutering
ASPCA: Spay-Neuter
UC Davis College of Veterinary Medicine: Spaying Your Cat or Dog
ASPCA: Top 10 Reasons to Spay or Neuter Your Pet
ASPCA: How Will Spaying Change My Dog?
The Humane Society of the United States: Myths and Facts About Spaying and Neutering
Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine: Spay Neuter Surgery
DogChannel.com: Spay and Neuter Facts

About the Author
Naomi Millburn has been a freelance writer since 2011. Her areas of writing expertise include arts and crafts, literature, linguistics, traveling, fashion and European and East Asian cultures. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American literature from Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo.