Personality Traits of Dachshunds

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Personality Traits of Dachshunds

One of the most loyal and caring dog breeds is the dachshund. These social canines are protective and caring of their family. While young children must be supervised so as not to accidentally injure these playful but petite canines, dachshunds are lively and very vocal. Though they are little, dachshund personality traits include confidence and courage.

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Modern dachshund behavior traits stem from the dachshund lineage of badger and rabbit hunting, and these dogs are determined and goal-focused. Dachshunds make great companions and love to be by their human's side as much as possible.

Dachshund personality and behavior

Every dog is different, and types of demeanors can vary based on an individual animal's life experiences and genetics, but dachshund dogs typically have an even, sweet disposition. Dachshunds make great family pets because they love to play and tend to be very caring and social.

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These dogs typically do well with children and other animals in the home. They enjoy socializing with people and other animals and are prone to separation anxiety. When they are left alone, they may revert to hunting instincts and can be destructive when away from their humans for extended periods of time. Dachshunds are also independent and clever. A dachshund's family is his passion. Dachshunds sometimes get jealous if they feel they are not getting enough attention from their owner.

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They are very vocal, frequent barkers. With training, this can be reduced. With persistence and positive reward for motivation, dachshund puppies can be trained. Begin gradually with socialization and self-control skills and add more strength and agility training slowly, focusing more on the latter when they are about 18 months old.

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Physical traits of dachshunds

When it comes to body size and structure, dachshunds are small, compact dogs with short, curved legs and compact feet. Dachshunds have a long rib cage and angled shoulders and upper arms. The standard smooth dachshund sheds less than many other breeds, and brushing once a week can help keep the skin and coat healthy. Those with longer fur will require a bit more grooming and more frequent combing to keep the fur smooth and clear of knots. With a shorter coat, smooth dachshunds strongly dislike chilly weather since they lose their body heat quickly and will not be able to spend much time outside unless they are wearing a coat or sweater.

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Dachshund traits include a high energy level and the need for frequent play and exercise. Standard dachshunds need at least one hour of daily physical activity, while miniature breeds need a minimum of 30 minutes. This can include playtime or walks with stops to sniff. They do well in cities or smaller spaces since they do not need a ton of space to play.

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Because of their body shape and structure, dachshunds are more prone to back issues, like invertebral disc disease, which can cause them pain. Miniature dachshunds are at high risk for heart disease. Eye issues, like dry eye and gradual vision loss, are also common among all versions of the breed.

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Dachshund lineage and history

While their exact origins are not certain, the first recorded evidence of dachshunds was in 18th century Germany. These small dogs, whose German name translates to "badger dog," were used for just that — badger hunting. Being small and low to the ground made it easy for them to sneak around and fit in small, tight spaces.

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The breed expanded in the 1800s, going to England with Prince Albert as well as America in 1875. During this time, there are also records of different dachshund fur types, including smooth, wire coat, and long fur. The long-fur dachshund was bred with the terrier, which possibly gave this facet of the breed a bit calmer of a disposition.

Also during that time period, the miniature dachshund was bred to catch rabbits amid a population boom in bunnies. Today, the dachshund remains one of the most popular dog breeds for pets, coming in at number 10 in the American Kennel Club's ranking.

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