The Dangers of Pulling a Dog's Tail

By Whitney Lowell

A dog's tail is located at the end of the vertebral column. It is considered the hind-most portion of the backbone. The tail typically contains 23 vertebrae, each enclosed by muscles. All dogs are born with tails, but some breeds have naturally short tail and others have their tails docked. No matter how long or short the tail may be, injury can occur if you pull on it. Though you might not damage the spinal cord, pulling a dog by the tail can certainly cause lifelong harm.

Tail Pull Injuries

A dog's tail is connected to the base of the spine. Pulling your dog's tail should not cause injury to the spinal cord, but you could cause serious injury to the base of the tail. The muscles at the base of the tail help him empty his bowels and bladder -- if the tail is pulled so hard that the base of the tail is compromised, he may suffer temporary or permanent incontinence and constipation. The tail may permanently sag, which can cause balance problems. The tail serves as counterbalance when you dog jumps, walks down a narrow path, turns sharp corners or climbs stairs.

By Whitney Lowell


About the Author
Whitney Lowell has been writing online since 2007. She writes for a variety of online publications and across a wide range of topics and niches. She has experience with animal rescue, dog training, pet health and breeding reptiles.