How to Take Care of Goldendoodle Puppies

Goldendoodle puppies require special care.
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A curly, cuddly cross between a golden retriever and a poodle, a goldendoodle makes an intelligent, good-natured pet. However, goldendoodle care requires special attention to the specialized needs of both poodles and golden retrievers.

Socialize him properly

The first three weeks of a puppy's life centers around evolving from total helplessness to learning to interact with his mom and littermates. Although you can pick up a puppy for a short time to get him used to your scent, the bulk of his time should be with his pack. Dogs removed from the litter at this age can be nervous and more prone to bark and bite, according to Cherry Lane Doodles. This is due to not learning the lessons from their dog family at this crucial age.

By 7 weeks, a goldendoodle is prepared to go to her permanent home to begin a lifelong bond with her human companions. Understand that this crucial time in her development is when she'll learn things that she'll incorporate permanently into her life. Keep experiences positive during this time of rapid learning. Weeks eight through 11 are your doodle's first fear imprint period, and traumatic or frightening experiences can last throughout her life.

Groom your "teddy bear"

With blocky heads, round eyes, and curly coats, many pups of this mixed breed get advertised as "teddy bear goldendoodles." There are other coat types of goldendoodles, including ones with the golden's straight coat or a semi-wavy coat with a mix of straight and curly locks. All coat types come with a life-long grooming responsibility, so it's crucial to get them used to a routine at an early age.

Although goldendoodles don't usually have the hypoallergenic coat of a standard poodle, each of the three varieties tends to shed less and have less dandruff to annoy allergy sufferers according to Smeraglia's Teddybear Goldendoodles.

How much grooming your pup needs depends on his coat type. Curly-coated puppies are easy to spot at birth by the crimped hair on their forehead, ears, or back. Doodles with curly coats need daily brushing, where the straight or wavy coats can get by with one or two times weekly.

Unless you're very active outdoors, your pup can do with a bath once every three to four weeks. Use baby shampoo or ED by Ellen, recommends Mini Doodle Dogs. Be sure to clean the inside of the ears using a separate baby wipe for each ear.

Engage their minds

Both poodles and golden retrievers rank high in dog intelligence. The brainy breeds require interaction, attention, and something for them to engage them mentally to prevent bad behavior brought on by boredom.

Doodles are easy to train and love being with their family. Keep your dog in a crate in your room, suggests Mini Doodle Dogs, and let them cuddle with a towel or a blanket, preferably with their mom and siblings' scent on it.

Teach them to ring a bell when they want to go outside. You can string brass bells to the back of your door leading outside at their nose level and help them ring it before you take them out to go potty. Eventually, the doodle will ring the bell to let you know when its time to go out.

More goldendoodle care

A goldendoodle puppy should eat three times per day, according to Mini Doodle Dogs. Set the bowl down for 15 to 20 minutes each time. Keep between-meal treats minimal: Most puppies aren't familiar with them and can get an upset stomach.

Keep up on your puppy's vaccinations — schedule regular consultations with the vet to check on your puppy's health. Keep her out of parks and other public places until fully vaccinated and given an "all clear" by the vet.

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